FruitFromWashington.com Home PageFun Stuff including free digital cardsWho are we?Growing FruitKittitas Valley Orchard GrowingHouse and GardenRecipes using Apples and Pears

Fruit From Washington - Official and Formal Toasts

Champagne is a favorite beverage for toasting, but any wine is appropriate. You would not offer a toast with a mixed drink or after dinner liqueur. A toast is rendered to the guest of honor by the departmental officials who host the dinner or luncheon. The toast usually begins with a welcome to the guest of honor. If the visitor is accompanied by his/her spouse, you may refer to the spouse in the toast. -- Source: Chapter 12 of “Til Wheels Are Up!” which appeared on the website of the 56th Fighter Wing Protocol Office of Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Protocol notes from the Air Force Wives Website.

Page Index

Blessings
Curses
Graces
Literary Toasts
Official Toasts & Speeches

United States of America
- Dedication of Harry S. Truman Building
-White House 200th Anniversary
President Roosevelt's Toast to General DeGaulle
President Kennedy's Toast to General DeGaulle
President John Quincy Adams Toast to General Lafayette

Bangladesh
Botswana
Brazil
Chile
China
Columbia
Egypt
England
France
Germany

India
Ireland
Israel - Egypt Peace
Kenya
Korea
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway

Poland
Spain
Thailand
Ukraine

Holiday Index
Holiday Gifts
Holiday Links

Holiday Menus
Holiday Poems
Holiday Recipes
Holiday Quotes
Holiday Recipes
Holiday Traditions

 


Search the Fruit From Washington Cooking Database by recipe name or ingredient to find something special that you're looking for!

If you don't have all the ingredients on hand that you need for these great recipes, start a shopping list courtesy of FruitFrom
Washington.com by clicking on the shopping links below!

Grocery Shopping
Going grocery shopping? Remember to check the list!
Shopping List

Recipe Quantity Calculator

Use Fruit From Washington's Recipe Adjuster Program to change any recipe to feed a crowd!

Toasts by Government Officials

The protocol of formal dinners requires an exchange of toasts. The exchange is quite formulaic. Each hosting dignitary or Head of State graciously thanks the other and pledges continued cooperation and friendship. The visiting dignitary responds with a mutually complimentary toast to complete the exchange.

President Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy and others at a formal dinner

President Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy and others at a formal dinner in Newport, Rhode Island. Cecil Stoughton, Photographer. (Source: John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library, Columbia Point, Boston, MA)

This collection of official toasts gathered by FruitFromWashington.com opens a small window on political and social history over the past half century. These official diplomatic toasts were made by Heads of State and members of government during formal dinners. We have excerpted the text of these toasts from State Department Press Releases and archival documents. In order for you to explore the full texts, we encourage you click on the links that appear within parentheses after each excerpt.

We ask all of you now to join us in a toast to those who have served their nations in an official capacity in the interest of promoting peace, prosperity and goodwill throughout the world. If you enjoy political and social history, you might find more than a passing interest in this collection of official toasts gathered by Fruit From Washington.

A toast may be given either with or without sentiment attached, and in either case a response equally fitting; but in the former the subject is narrowed and defined by the nature of the sentiment. Yet the speaker need not hold himself closely to the sentiment, which is often made rather a point of departure even by the ablest speakers. Indeed, the latitude accorded to after-dinner speeches is very great, and a sentiment which gives unity and direction to the speech made in response to it is, on that account, of great value. -- Source: TOASTS AND FORMS OF PUBLIC ADDRESS FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO SAY THE RIGHT THING IN THE RIGHT WAY By WILLIAM PITTENGER


Photograph of the Four Presidents (Reagan, Carter, Ford, Nixon) toasting in the Blue Room. - October 8, 1981. Source: National Archives and Records Administration

We have annotated various Official Toasts by Heads of State and Other Governmental Dignitaries that were most often performed during Formal Dinners, as examples of ritual diplomacy involving representatives of twenty or more countries, dating from 1944 to almost the present day—

“We are enlisted in this country in the great task of bringing that great day, the liberation of France, even closer. When that day has come, and the government of France is restored to its own people, a great many of us will want to be there and see France, see the rejuvenated France, and taking its rightful place among all the nations.

So today -- there is going to be another Toast, but this one, first, I want to drink to the speeding up of the complete liberation of France.”

(PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT DEGAULLE AT A STATE LUNCHEON )-- 7/7/44

“As an American I take pleasure in seeing people around the world salute the American Revolution and the principles for which we fought. As Frenchmen, I know that you take satisfaction that people around the world invoke your great motto of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity. What counts, of course, is not merely the words, but the meaning behind them. We believe in liberty and equality and fraternity. We believe in life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And we believe that the right of the individual are preeminent, not merely the slogans and the mottoes which are invoked across the globe by those who make themselves our adversary. We believe in the significance behind these great ideas. Therefore, I think it quite natural that in the most difficult decade of the 1960's, France and the United States should be once again associated together.

It is a particular source of satisfaction to me as President of the United States that we should be associated with President DeGaulle. He stands now as the only great leader of World War II who occupies a position of high responsibility. The others have gone and he remains, and he stands true to the same concept which he fought for during the Second World War, the sovereignty of France, the community of the Western Nations. And therefore, as a junior figure on this field, which he has occupied for more than twenty years, I ask you to drink to the great Captain of the West, your President, General DeGaulle.”

(PRESIDENT KENNEDY IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT DEGAULLE IN FRANCE)-- 5/31/61

“Most of the times in history when a peace treaty was signed, one nation has been a victor and the other nation has been vanquished. One nation has won; the other nation has lost. Today we've signed a peace treaty when both nations have won....

I would like to note here a simple fact: that when others could not or would not move to end the seemingly endless tragedy of the Middle East, two men -- President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menahem Begin -- dared to think the unthinkable, dared to do what others feared could not be done, dared to seize history in their hands and to turn history toward peace. And I am thankful to them both....

And now, I would like to propose a toast: To the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt, Anwar al-Sadat, and to the Prime Minister of the State of Israel, Menahem Begin; to the great peoples they serve, the people of Egypt and the people of Israel, now joined together in hope; and to the cause we all serve: salaam, shalom, and to peace.”

Menahem Begin, Jimmy Carter and Anwar al-Sadat

(TOAST OF PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER ON THE OCCASION OF THE SIGNING OF THE EGYPTIAN-ISRAELI PEACE TREATY)--3/26/79
Prime Minister Menahem Begin, President Jimmy Carter and President Anwar Sadat at Camp David, 9/07/1978. Photo source: Jimmy Carter Library, 441 Freedom Parkway, Atlanta, Georgia.

“I came here hopeful and optimistic, Mr. President. After our first session, I have become most confident and certain, under your upright and under your inspiring leadership, this great country can realize its dreams and reach its goals. On behalf of the Egyptian people, I invite you, Mr. President, and your family to visit Egypt. This will give our people an opportunity to express to you directly their feelings of gratitude and respect. Such a visit will also serve the cause of peace and stability in the Middle East. It will enable us to pursue this stimulating dialog and bolster the bonds of friendship and mutual understanding. Dear friends, allow me to invite you to rise in a tribute to President Reagan, Mrs. Reagan, and the friendly people of the United States.”

(REMARKS OF PRESIDENT ANWAR AL-SADAT OF EGYPT TO PRESIDENT REAGAN IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS AT A STATE DINNER)-- 8/5/81

“King Juan Carlos, Queen Sophia, and the Spanish people have risen to the task God has placed before them, and the world is being given a majestic gift -- a truly free and prosperous Spain. Over the centuries, Spain has contributed so much. Whether one talks of the great Cervantes and the development of modern literature, or refers to the painting of Goya or El Greco, certainly Spain has provided Western civilization with a multitude of priceless gifts. And now, King Juan Carlos, with the courage of el Cid and the skill of the great Spanish masters, is creating a masterpiece of democracy. In America we recognize that even with the proper leadership, a nation must have great people to maintain liberty. And in the case of Spain, we have total confidence. So tonight, I ask you to join me in a toast to Their Majesties, to King Juan Carlos, Queen Sophia, and to the people of Spain. May they live in peace and freedom benefiting such a great people.

(REMARKS OF PRESIDENT REAGAN TO KING JUAN CARLOS I & QUEEN SOPHIA IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS AT A STATE DINNER)-- 10/13/81

Like your country, Spain defends peace and the rule of law, opposes threats and the use of force, and rejects all outside interference in its own affairs. It is in these terms that we conceive our international relations, which we wish to maintain peacefully with all peoples. Our friendship with the American nation is as old as its origins. Yesterday, the day of our arrival in your country, was the 489th anniversary of the arrival of the Spaniards to this continent. With that magnificent event a new era began in world history, and through that heroic exploit, which was followed up by explorers and colonizers, the lands of America, from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego, came to form part -- and still do form a fundamental part of our Western World. You also know, Mr. President, better than I, what the Spanish presence has meant in the American West -- the tremendous work carried out by the Spanish explorers, missionaries, and colonizers in that region; the founding of dozens of towns and cities which even today form a rosary of names echoing with the sounds of Spain. These are links, Mr. President, which nothing and nobody can break; very strong ties which transcend the vicissitudes of the moment and serve to reinforce the mutual understanding and friendship of our two peoples. This friendship now takes on a new dimension in view of our will to reinforce our progressive participation in the European and Western effort, aimed at achieving a world that is ever freer and more just and in which our sister nations may fully participate. To the relations between Spain and the United States, that in the future they may produce abundant fruit and that the ties which unite our two countries may intensify and become ever closer, I raise my glass tonight. With my good wishes for the well-being of the great American people, and for your own personal happiness, Mr. President and Mrs. Reagan.

(REMARKS OF KING JUAN CARLOS I TO PRESIDENT AND MRS. REAGAN IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS AT A STATE DINNER)-- 10/13/81

Like many others, I devoted part of my life, the best part of my life, to freedom, true freedom -- the freedom for which Washington's volunteers and also the French soldiers of year two of the French Revolution fought. And I felt in my own flesh and in my mind the inestimable price of such liberty for having lived in the French Resistance, those terrible years when our country was deprived of such freedom.

I learned in those dark days in France, a country that was hurt and humiliated and that owes you so much, that our main duty towards the others and towards ourselves is to struggle with all our might, always and ever, for freedom.

Now, how would I not feel, so to speak, in fact, as if I were one of your cousins in a way when I hear others, such as yourselves, use the plain and sound language of freedom? It is a language that we have in common. It is a code of expression for the mind and the heart, which allows a simple exchange to take place among us, even though some of them, and I'm afraid I am one of them, some of us, in fact, will speak the American language in such an imperfect fashion that it would not be safe to try to use it, and I wish to ask you to forgive me for this.

At least I did hear, and I have remembered, as many, many of my compatriots, the two words that the insurgents were shouting when they were rushing the trenches in Yorktown and which were the -- for some of them -- the last words of their life, ``God and liberty.''

May I say that I have this very much in mind when I'm raising my glass, Mr. President, to your excellent and powerful health, to Mrs. Reagan, and to the good health of Franco-American friendship, which I have certainly not found in any way endangered by our divergencies or differences of opinion during our talks, where the frankness among us was the kind of thing that old friends can demonstrate in order to be able to talk to each other without having to take too many precautions.

I would like to associate here in our gathering a thought for the millions of men and women who are in danger of famine and who are in fact listening, listening to what will come out of Cancun, where you and I, Mr. President, we will, with the other participants in the North-South conference, have an opportunity to pursue and to continue in greater depth our conversations of today.

We have other trenches, in fact, to overcome with the cry of ``liberty.'' And the entrenchments of suffering and sorrow of man are more abrupt even than those of Yorktown or the walls of our Bastille. But the cry, our cry will be the same, 'liberty."

I will raise my glass to your health, Mr. President, and to thank you for the very warm welcome that we have received in this city and in this country. And I know that all the French who have been guests of your country have always been received with the same warm welcome.

And to you, Madam, I would like to say how much I enjoyed our conversations in London and here in Williamsburg, and thanks to them I have learned to know more who you are. I have learned better to appreciate your charm and the presence of the First Lady of the United States.

I would also like to raise my glass to my good friend Lord Hailsham and through him to his country, because though between our two countries there have over the centuries been a lot of quarreling, since then another friendship and a very strong friendship was born, has been born, and I will say more about this tomorrow.

And we do not forget that in 1940, the knight -- the fighter for freedom was and was alone the United Kingdom. I would like to raise my glass to all our American hosts. The French who are here know that we are in fact speaking with the same heart.

And I would like our American hosts to know that France is a country that wishes to achieve more justice and that will choose the parts in order to achieve that, according to its tastes. And France is a country who wishes by her experience to prolong the civilization, the civilization that was born two centuries ago, and that if it is to prolong itself and continue to act and act with power, it must learn to adapt and to change itself and to evolve while always remaining faithful to the original message.

Thank you.

Note: President Reagan spoke at 10 p.m. at the Royal Governor's Palace. President Mitterrand spoke in French, and his remarks were translated by an interpreter. The Rt. Honorable Lord Hailsham is the Lord Chancellor of the United Kingdom.

REMARKS OF PRESIDENT FRANCOIS MITTERRAND TO PRESIDENT AND MRS. REAGAN IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS AT A STATE DINNER IN WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA)-- 10/18/81

“More than a century ago in the winter of 1858, the great Ukrainian national poet, Taras Shevchenko, had just returned to St. Petersburg from internal exile in the Russian Far East. There he met the acclaimed American black actor, Ira Aldridge, who was in the city performing Shakespeare. The son of Ukrainian serfs and the son of American slaves became fast friends. Theirs was a friendship born of shared ideals -- above all the dream of freedom for all peoples. It was that dream that led Shevchenko to condemn despotism with the line, "Freedom knows no dying."

Ira Aldridge was so impressed by his friend Shevchenko that it was said of him that forever after he carried Ukraine in his heart. The steadfast devotion to freedom that brought Shevchenko and Aldridge together has also brought us together tonight. So I ask all of you to join me in a toast to President and Mrs. Kuchma, to the growing friendship of our peoples and the bright future of a prosperous and free Ukraine.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON TO PRESIDENT KUCHMA IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--11/22/94

“Let me also say, Mr. President, you know that you have come here, along with your wife and your fine delegation, at a very difficult time for our country. And all the American people have been profoundly impressed and grateful by your expressions of condolence and sympathy and your assertion that we are all partners in the struggle against evil and inhumanity. For that we are especially grateful, and we will never forget it. So I ask all of you to stand and raise your glasses in a toast to President and Mrs. Cardoso and to the people of Brazil.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT CARDOSO OF BRAZIL)--4/20/95

“Thank you for the wonderful warmth of your welcome. And I, in turn, would like to invite you to rise and join with me, for the second time today, it will have to be a slainte -- a slainte, a very special toast to the very deep friendship between the people of Ireland and the people of the United States and the linkages between our peoples, and to the way in which the people of the United States are so supportive of peace and reconciliation on the island of Ireland.”

(PRESIDENT ROBINSON OF IRELAND IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT CLINTON)--6/13/96

“I toast you, Mr. President, and you, Mrs. Clinton, for that visionary leadership your government has shown. I toast your people and their freedom. I toast the brotherhood of our two countries. I toast the Americas of the 21st century. I'm standing today here before you very optimistic, with great confidence, with great determination, and I'm certain that both of us, together, we will build a better future for all those men and women that sometimes see progress pass by. I’m certain that you and me and my government and your government, our countries will build the Americas of the 21st century.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON AND PRESIDENT FREI OF CHILE, IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--2/26/97

“As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Marshall Plan, let us commit ourselves to build upon its success for the next 50 years and beyond. And let us now join in a toast to Her Majesty and the people of the Netherlands in gratitude for this great and good day.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH QUEEN OF NETHERLANDS, The Hague, Netherlands)--5/28/97

Marshall Plan at work in the Netherlands,  ca. 1948

Marshall Plan Reclamation Project, covering 480 square miles, that transformed the coastline of Holland, the Zuyder Zee, into productive farmland. Photographer, George Rodger (ca. 1948-1955). Photo source: Still Picture Branch, National Archives at College Park, Maryland.

“American poet, Longfellow, once wrote, ‘But to act that each tomorrow finds us farther than today. Act, act, in the living present.’ We should go along with the trend of the times and respond to the will of the people and continue our march forward toward the establishment and development of a constructive strategic partnership between our two countries. Now I would like to propose a toast to the heirs of Mr. President and Mrs. Clinton -- to the heirs of all our friends here, to the friendship between our two peoples and their well-being, and toward peace and prosperity. Thank you.”

(REMARKS OF PRESIDENT JIANG ZEMIN IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT CLINTON)--10/29/97

“Mr. President, we face still greater challenge than those we have overcome for our country, our continent, and the entire world. The United States is an especially valued partner as we seek to make the world a better place for all who live in it. Ladies and gentlemen, would you please join me in a toast to President Clinton and the people of the United States of America.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT MANDELA WITH PRESIDENT CLINTON IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--3/27/98

“Mr. President, you recently wrote, ‘Even a superpower needs friends.’ (Laughter and applause.) Truer words were never written. (Laughter.) And so, Mr. President, I thank you for the friendship that unites us personally and for the unbreakable friendship that joins our people.

And, ladies and gentlemen, I ask you to join me in raising a glass to President Roman Herzog and to the people of the Federal Republic of Germany.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON WITH PRESIDENT HERZOG IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--5/13/98

“We are resolved to send the next generation of our young to school and not to war. Here with us tonight is my friend Gabriel Garcia Marquez -- (applause) -- our Nobel laureate, who has given me and our country his solemn pledge to devote himself to the cause of education for all the children of Colombia. Also with us this evening is another friend, Fernando Botero, who has given so much through his art, not only to his home town of Medellin and the violence-stricken province of Antioquia, but also to his country and to the world.

In that spirit I say to each of you here, let us stand side by side for peace and human rights, and against drugs, in a tireless pursuit of prosperity for our hemisphere, our nations, and all our peoples. Let us end all conflicts, close down the drug supply and the drug demand, open up trade and investment, teach our children, and raise up the horizons of our future.

...Ladies and gentlemen, let me raise my glass on behalf of the people of Colombia and offer a toast to the President of the United States.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT ANDRES PASTRANA OF COLUMBIA WITH PRESIDENT CLINTON IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS )--10/28/98

“I have mentioned often that, as all of you know probably, when the new millennium dawns it will dawn first on New Zealand. I will be proud to cross that bridge into the 21st century with you, knowing that we will be partners for peace and prosperity, and a more decent and humane future for all our children. And I thank you for that partnership.

I'd like to ask all of you to join me in a toast to the Prime Minister, to her wonderful husband, to her government, and to the people of New Zealand.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON AND PRIME MINISTER SHIPLEY IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS Wigram Air Museum Christchurch, New Zealand )--9/15/99

“Once, Franklin Roosevelt said that any nation seeking to resist tyranny and build democracy need only, and I quote, ‘look to Norway.’ It remains just as true today. Free people still look to Norway, and will always do so. Your Majesty, I am grateful for all you have done to keep our friendship strong, to prepare our kindred nations for a new century and a new millennium -- when we will have some more shared history based on our shared values.

I ask all of you now to join me in a toast to King Harald, to the Queen, to the people of Norway, and to our wonderful alliance.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON TO HIS MAJESTY KING HARALD V. IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)-- 11/1/99

“St. Isadore once wrote, ‘Spain is the most beautiful of all the lands extending from the West to India; for through her, East and West receive light.’ Today, may the light of our friendship continue to inspire and enlighten nations from East to West, as we work to build a world that is more democratic, more open, more free, and at peace.

I ask you all to join me in a toast to the King and Queen of Spain, and the people of their wonderful country.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON AND KING JUAN CARLOS 1 OF SPAIN IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS AT THE STATE DINNER)--2/23/00

“Tomorrow the sun will rise on a deeper friendship between America and Bangladesh. Through our ceremonies and our conversations, we have hastened the arrival of a more peaceful new day -- the kind of day that Tagore spent his life imagining. A new day comprehending not only the absence of war and suffering, but the presence of mutual understanding and common endeavors.

On behalf of all Americans, I pledge that we will work with you to build on this good day, to soften the hard facts of daily hardship, to make real the poetry of our finest aspirations.

I ask you now to join me in a toast to the President, the Prime Minister, the people of Bangladesh and the friendship between our two nations. May it grow. May it deepen. May it affect the lives of our people in ways that are truly good.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON AND PRESIDENT AHMED IN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS, BANGABHAWAN DHAKA, BANGLADESH)-- 3/20/00

“In the days to come, may our two nations always remain examples of tolerance and the power of diversity. May we build societies that draw upon the talents and energies of all our people. May we preserve the beauty and natural richness of this small planet that we share. May we work together to make the difficult choices and the necessary investments, as Nehru once instructed, ‘to advance the larger cause of humanity.’ In the spirit of that partnership and that vision, I ask you all to join me in raising a glass to the President, the Prime Minister, and the people of this wonderful nation which has welcomed us.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT NARAYANAN OF INDIA, RASHTRAPATI BHAVAN, DELHI)-- 3/21/00

“Let us all, then, toast the good name of Harry S Truman. And let us honor his memory by heeding his example -- to keep America strong and respected, prosperous and at peace.”

(TOAST BY SECRETARY OF STATE MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT AT THE DINNER ON THE OCCASION OF THE DEDICATION OF DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUILDING AS HARRY S TRUMAN BUILDING)-- 9/22/00

“I salute you and all those yet to grace these halls with the words of the very first occupant of the White House, John Adams, who said: I pray to heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house, and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but the honest and wise rule under this roof.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT CLINTON IN A TOAST AT WHITE HOUSE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION 200TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER)-- 11/09/00

“We know we can count on Poland to keep reaching out to its neighbors, showing them the way and helping them help themselves. We know we can count on Poland to continue its reforms. And Poland can count on America. We are in Europe to stay, because we know the danger of retreating behind the false security of an ocean.

Together, our countries know what faith, commitment and integrity can build. Our partnership is going to last a long time, always mindful of where we have been; always moving forward to build the future we know we want, the future we know we can achieve.

My toast is for a free Poland, its leadership, and the courageous souls who made it happen. God bless. (Applause.)”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT KWASNIEWSKI OF POLAND)--6/15/01

“A century and a half ago, another occupant of this house, Abraham Lincoln, paused in the darkest hour of this country's history to send a word of hope to Mexico. Lincoln knew how closely the fates of our two countries were linked. And he never lost faith in the character of our two people. In April of 1861, he directed his Secretary of State to tell Mexico of his high respect for the heroism of their people, and above all, their inextinguishable love of civil liberty.

My message to the Mexican people is the same. The respect of my nation endures, and it deepens. The United States has no more important relationship in the world than our relationship with Mexico. Each of our countries is proud of our independence, our freedom, and our democracy. We are united by values and carried forward by common hopes.

And so, Mr. President, speaking friend to friend, partner to partner, neighbor to neighbor, I offer a toast to you, to your gracious wife, and to your great nation. (A toast is offered.)”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH IN AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT FOX OF MEXICO)--9/06/01

Mr. President, I am certain that your visit this time to Korea will serve as a great opportunity not only for further solidifying the Korea-U.S. friendship, but also for the realization of peace here on the Korean Peninsula. Mr. President, this year marks the 120th anniversary of formal diplomatic ties between our two countries. And as they say, Mr. President, friends and wine -- the older the better. And in this spirit -- (laughter) -- the time-honored friendly and cooperative relations of Korea and the United States will further mature in the 21st century. Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, please join me now in a toast to the health and well-being and happiness of Mr. President and Mrs. Laura Bush, and for the everlasting friendship between Korea and the United States. (A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY KOREAN PRESIDENT KIM DAE-JUNG DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT BUSH IN SEOUL, REPUBLIC OF KOREA)--2/20/02

“I'm delighted to once again welcome you to Botswana, Mr. President, and members of your high delegation. It is an honor and a privilege on behalf of the government and people of Botswana to thank you for honoring us with a visit, and for your pro-African initiatives on AIDS and trade.

This visit, the second of its kind by a President of the United States is, indeed, a welcome gesture of the friendship that exists between our countries. The United States and Botswana have enjoyed many years of fruitful and beneficial relations...

...Mr. President, we also welcome your administration's encouragement of and collaboration with your country's private sector in the fight against the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole, and in Botswana, in particular.

Distinguished ladies and gentlemen, may I now ask you to join me in drinking a toast to the continued good health and happiness of the President of the United States, Mr. George W. Bush, and First Lady, Mrs. Laura Bush; to continued friendship and cooperation between Botswana and the United States of America; and, of course, to international peace and security for which the President stands.

To the President.” (A toast was delivered.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT MOGAE OF BOTSWANA TO PRESIDENT BUSH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)-- 07/10/03

“My country is acting to help all of Africa in turning the tide against AIDS. This is the deadliest enemy Africa has ever faced and you will not face this enemy alone. Together, our two nations are determined to build an Africa that is growing in peace, in prosperity and in hope. So let us toast to the enduring friendship between the United States and the Republic of Botswana. Mr. President, to your health, and to your country's success.” (A toast was delivered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH TO PRESIDENT MOGAE OF BOTSWANA DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)-- 07/10/03

“There is a Swahili proverb which says, 'Forever persist; a rope can cut stone.' Kenya and its leaders have been persistent and courageous in the cause of freedom, you're resolved in the fight against terror. Kenya is an example to all of Africa, and a respected partner of America. For all these reasons, Mr. President, I'm pleased to offer a toast to the enduring friendship between Kenya and the United States of America.” (A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT KIBAKI OF KENYA )-- 10/06/03

“My government supports your efforts and those of the international community in the war against terrorism. There will be sacrifice to be made. As the world becomes a safer place, your efforts and ours, and of those who love peace in this direction, will be appreciated even by our critics. Mr. President, my government looks forward to working together with your administration in resolving the conflicts in the Horn of Africa. I am happy to inform you that we are making every good progress towards durable peace and stability in the Sudan. Significant progress has also been made in the Somali peace talks. We commend your government for the support you continue to render for these initiatives. Peace and stability is crucial for the sustainable development of our subregion. May I, now, request you, ladies and gentlemen, to be upstanding and to toast the good health of President George Bush and the First Lady, Laura Bush, and for the continued good relations between our two countries.”

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT KIBAKI OF KENYA DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT BUSH )-- 10/06/03

“Thank you, Your Majesty, for your warm and gracious welcome. Thanks also to Her Majesty, the Queen, for hosting this event. I thank, as well, the Grand Chamberlain who earlier today led us on a tour of the magnificent Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Laura and I have been seeing the famous hospitality of the Thai people, and we are most grateful.

The United States of America deeply values our alliance with the Kingdom of Thailand. Your Majesty, the world has changed greatly since your reign began 57 years ago. Yet thanks to your enlightened leadership and steady hand, the friendship between our two nations has remained constant...

...Thailand is a principled, generous nation, rising to meet the challenges of our time. Thailand's positive influence in the world is inspired by the fine example of service that Your Majesty, and Her Majesty, the Queen, set for your people. It's also vivid in the great, humane traditions of this land. America is honored to have your friendship.

So I offer a toast to Your Majesties, to the Royal Family, and to your great nation.” (A toast is offered.)

(REMARKS MADE BY PRESIDENT BUSH IN A TOAST TO THEIR MAJESTIES AND MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL FAMILY OF THAILAND AT THE GRAND PALACE )-- 10/19/03

THE QUEEN: Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen. It gives me great pleasure to welcome you and Mrs. Bush to London. Visits by American presidents have been memorable landmarks in my reign. Unlike in the United States, the British head of state is not limited to two terms of four years. (Laughter.) And I have welcomed no fewer than seven of your predecessors.

The first U.S. President to stay at Buckingham Palace was Woodrow Wilson, in December 1918. America had then been fighting alongside us in the first world war, and was to do so again in our hour of need, during the second world war. And at the very core of the new international and multi-lateral order which emerged after the shared sacrifices of that last terrible world war was a vital dynamic transatlantic partnership, working with other allies to create effective international institutions.

The Marshall Plan led to the beginnings of the European Union, and the establishment of NATO became the bedrock for European security. Sixty years ago, Winston Churchill coined the term "special relationship," to describe the close collaboration between the United Kingdom and United States forces that was instrumental in freeing Europe from tyranny.

Despite occasional criticism of the term, I believe it admirably describes our friendship. Like all special friends, we can talk frankly and we can disagree from time to time -- even sometimes fallout over a particular issue. But the depth and breadth of our partnership means that there is always so much we are doing together at all levels, that disputes can be quickly overcome and forgiven....

All this is founded on our long-standing sense of common purpose, our shared values and shared interests, our deep underlying sense of respect and affection. We are bound across the generations by much more, too: we share the confidence and the courage to try and make this a more prosperous, a safer and, above all, a freer world. The reason for this, Mr. President, is written in our history. As your father said in his own Inaugural Address, "We know what is right, freedom is right." So ladies and gentlemen, I ask you to raise your glasses to President and Mrs. Bush, to the continued friendship between our two nations and to the health, prosperity and happiness of the people of the United States. (A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY BRITAIN'S QUEEN ELIZABETH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT BUSH IN LONDON, ENGLAND)--11/19/03

THE PRESIDENT: Your Majesty, Your Royal Highness, and distinguished guests. Laura and I are deeply honored to accept Your Majesty's gracious hospitality and to be welcomed into your home. Through the last century, and into our own, Americans have appreciated the friendship of your people. And we are grateful for your personal commitment across five decades to the health and vitality of the alliance between our nations. Of course, things didn't start out too well. (Laughter.) Yet, even at America's founding, our nations shared a basic belief in human liberty. That conviction, more than anything else, led to our reconciliation. And in time, our shared commitment to freedom became the basis of a great Atlantic alliance that defeated tyranny in Europe and saved the liberty of the world. The story of liberty, the story of the Magna Carta and the Declaration of Independence continues in our time. The power of freedom has touched Asia and Latin America and Africa and beyond. And now our two countries are carrying out a mission of freedom and democracy in Afghanistan and Iraq. Once again, America and Britain are joined in the defense of our common values. Once again, American and British service members are sacrificing in a necessary and noble cause. Once again, we are acting to secure the peace of the world. The bonds between our countries were formed in hard experience. We passed through great adversity together, we have risen through great challenges together. The mutual respect and fellowship between our countries is deep and strong and permanent. Let us raise our glasses to our common ideals, to our enduring friendships, to the preservation of our liberties and to Her Majesty, the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. (A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH BRITAIN'S QUEEN ELIZABETH IN LONDON, ENGLAND)--11/19/03

“Good afternoon. Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, it is a pleasure to welcome you all to U.N. Headquarters. Over the next two weeks, nearly a hundred heads of state and government and other leaders will be here for the general debate. I must admit that these numbers have taken us a bit by surprise. It is encouraging, indeed, to see such strong show of support for the United Nations, our United Nations. That said, I hope that next year's turnout will even be better. By then, you will have in your hands some very important reports and proposals on our collective security, on our prospects for achieving the Millennium Development goals, and on the future of this organization. Of course, every Assembly session is important, but I hope next year will be a time when change is the order of the day, and when bold and fundamental decisions can be taken. I said last year, and repeated it again this morning, that we were at a fork in the road. As ominous as that might sound, and as difficult as the challenges we face, a fork in the road is not just a threat or a crisis, it is also an opportunity. I remain convinced that we can heal divisions and find common ground. Your presence here tells me you recognize the need for international cooperation to keep growing. This year and next, let us be creative, let us act with urgency and let us move from ambitious pledges and to concrete action. In that spirit, I would like to propose a toast -- a toast to peace, to progress, and to making our organization an effective instrument for all. Thank you. Cheers.” (A toast is offered.)

(REMARKS BY UNITED NATIONS SECRETARY GENERAL ANNAN DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH PRESIDENT BUSH)-- 09/21/04

“Mr. Secretary General, with admiration for your leadership, and with confidence in this organization, I offer a toast to you and your service, and to the United Nations.” (A toast is offered.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS WITH UNITED NATIONS SECRETARY GENERAL ANNAN)-- 09/21/04

PRESIDENT BUSH: Mr. President, distinguished guests: Laura and I offer you a warm welcome to the White House -- or should I say: Bienvenue a la Maison Blanche. (Applause.)

In 1777, another George W. welcomed to America another Frenchman. His name was Lafayette. The two leaders built a strong friendship, based on common values and common virtues. They both recognized the power of human freedom. They both served with courage in freedom's cause. And they both anticipated that freedom would advance in other lands following its victory here in America.

President George W. Bush and Mrs. Laura Bush stand with President Nicolas Sarkozy of France on the North Portico of the White House after his arrival for dinner Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007.

Two centuries later, our two nations are honoring their legacy of Lafayette by helping others resist tyranny and terror. French and American troops are helping to defend a young democracy in Afghanistan. Our two nations support the democratic government of Lebanon. We agree that reconciliation and democracy in Iraq are vital to the future of the Middle East. And our two nations condemn violations of human rights in Darfur, in Burma and around the world.

France and the United States can meet great challenges when we work together, Mr. President. You and I share a commitment to deepen the cooperation of our two republics -- and through this cooperation, we can make the world a better place.

I look forward to our discussions at Mount Vernon, where George Washington welcomed his friend, Lafayette. And in the spirit of their friendship, I offer a toast to you -- and to some of America's oldest friends, the free people of France.” (A toast is offered.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT BUSH DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--11/06/07

PRESIDENT SARKOZY: (As translated) ...So here I am in Washington on a first Tuesday in November. (Laughter.) Now, I have no electoral ambitions when it comes to the U.S. -- (laughter) -- even though I know it's a very special day because it's the day on which Americans elect their President. So allow me to celebrate the memory and pay tribute to the long line of American Presidents who have always put forward, who have always given priority to the friendship between our two countries.

President Nicolas Sarkozy offers a toast during dinner in his honor Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2007, at the White House. Said the French President, ". I say the following words from the bottom of my heart: Long live Franco-American friendship. Long live the United States. Long live France."

George talked about Lafayette and he talked about George Washington. Bear with me as I recount this anecdote. To President John Quincy Adams, who was welcoming Lafayette in these self-same walls, in this self-same house, on the occasion of his 66th birthday, and broke with the customs, the protocol of the time, suggested to the general -- to the French general that they drink a toast, as he said, to the 22nd of February and to the 6th of September, which were the birthdays of Washington and of Lafayette, himself.

On the onset of that, Lafayette responded, "No, let there be no toast to my birthday, or even to that of George Washington. Let us raise our glasses and toast the 4th of July, which is the day that liberty was born." And you know, for all of us, liberty is exemplified and symbolized by America. For those of my generation, America was not the country that promised liberty and freedom; it is the country that gave liberty and freedom.

Ladies and gentlemen, I would invite you, therefore, to raise your glasses, and let us drink to the health of President George Bush, and if you would allow me, madam, to you, Mrs. Laura Bush, and to the alliance between our two peoples. And I say the following words from the bottom of my heart: Long live Franco-American friendship. Long live the United States. Long live France. (A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

(REMARKS BY PRESIDENT SARKOGY OF FRANCE DURING AN EXCHANGE OF TOASTS)--11/06/07

Return to Top of Page

 

Home ] Up ]Beverages ] Breads ] Breakfasts ] [ Cheeses ] [ Cookies & Candies ] Desserts ] Drying Fruit ] [ Frozen Desserts ] [ Main Dishes ] [ Pies ] [ Preserves ] Salads ]
[ Smoking Foods ] [ Calorie Search ] [ Recipe Database Search ] [ Recipe Quantity Converter ]

 

Contact Us Online by Using our Feedback Form

Page Update March 8, 2012

Copyright